Stories From the Frontier


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Powdery Mildew and the Evolutionary Arms Race

By Michele Wiseman, MSc, Plant Pathology As the temperatures cool, days shorten, buds swell, and clouds return, so do many dreaded foes, including powdery mildew. Powdery mildew fungi (in the family Erysiphaceae) are obligate parasites to over 10,000 different vascular plant species. Being an obligate parasite means they cannot complete their life cycle without a specific, suitable, and living host. Despite being ubiquitous, powdery mildews remain fairly host-specific, so you…

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Clone Groups in the Phylos Galaxy

We just released a new version of the Phylos Galaxy that includes two significant updates: Clone Groups and Variety Panels. The result is an easier navigation experience and more information about each sample and the grower who submitted them. Previously, all the cuttings from one variety were shown as nodes on the Galaxy. Even though they’re genetically identical clonal samples, they have very small differences between them and were rarely…

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Mom is Always Right: Environmental Effects on Plant Biology Across Generations

This post is written by Gaby Auge, a plant scientist at Duke University. It discusses one of the most startling findings in plant biology: plants seem to actually learn things about their environments and then pass this knowledge onto their progeny. Insights like this, from basic research on the plant kingdom in general, will soon start to change how we understand and grow Cannabis. By Gaby Auge, PhD  Living organisms…

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The Clone Wars

Written by Mowgli Holmes, PhD  Today, most commercially available cannabis is grown from clones rather than seeds. Cloning is the process whereby a grower takes cuttings from a mature plant and roots them, allowing them to grow into new plants that are genetically identical to their “mother” plant. Most important agricultural crops are either grown from seeds or by cloning—but rarely by both methods. It’s yet another curiosity of the…

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The Magnificent Diversity of Cannabis

Nearly ten thousand years ago, when humans were just learning to save and re-plant seeds, some tribes in Central Asia started taking care of the plant that would turn out to be the ancestor of today’s cannabis. Cannabis can be used for lots of different things, and we don’t know which of these uses came first. In any case, it was useful. So useful, in fact, that humans eventually brought…

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